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Directions in Highway Safety Cover - Summer 2012 Download Newsletter pdf
[2.2 MB, 12 pgs.]

Summer 2012

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From Our Perspective: National Coalition for Safer Roads on Automated Enforcement

By David Kelly, President and Executive Director
National Coalition for Safer Roads

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It is a crucial time for traffic safety professionals across the country to stand together on automated enforcement. We know speeding is a factor in almost a third of traffic safety fatalities. We need to untie the hands of our law enforcement and let them do their jobs. We need a national strategy to address speeding.

History and recent fatality estimates suggest that we can expect to see a reversal of some of the gains made in highway safety over the past five years. We cannot sit back and let this happen. We need to employ all available tools to continue driving down fatalities, including the use of technology. As a society, we invite technology into our lives every day in an effort to make things a little easier. It is unfair that some don’t want law enforcement to utilize technology that aids in making their jobs more efficient. We can no longer ask them to do more with less if we don’t give them the proper tools. Automated enforcement is one of those tools.

The National Coalition for Safer Roads (NCSR) advocates for the use of safety cameras in cities and communities across the country. National studies demonstrate that when this technology is put to work, the number of fatalities due to red-light running decreases. Lives are saved and communities are safer. These safety cameras are part of an emerging body of technology intended to change the way people drive by creating consequences for those who drive recklessly or inattentively.

Innocent lives are lost every day because of someone else’s reckless decision to run a red light. In 2009 alone, more than 676 people were killed and 113,000 were injured in crashes nationwide that involved redlight running. More than half of those killed in the crashes were pedestrians, cyclists and people other than the red-light runner, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

NCSR is pleased to stand with GHSA and its recent call for a national dialogue on speeding. We have let the other side win this debate for too long without pushing back. This is where righteous indignation should come into play. It’s time to say enough is enough.

NCSR brings together industry experts, community leaders, victims of red-light running, parents and other concerned citizens to support the use of red-light safety technology in cities and communities across the country. Through our national efforts and continued work with adjoining local coalitions, we strive to raise awareness of the benefits safety camera enforcement programs can bring to every state across the country. We hope you will join us.

For more information, visit http://NCSRsafety, follow @SaferRoadsUSA on Twitter and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SaferRoadsUSA.